Brownsville ‘Revival’- Before The Beginning – A Different Story

Toronto-Brompton-Brownsville Connection

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/ACCT.HTM
Toronto Connection – John K.’s Wife – Steve Hill @  Brompton Church UK
The Toronto blessing was received by Rev Kilpatrick’s wife prior to the beginning of the Brownsville revival according to Rev Kilpatrick himself. She apparently, sometime prior to the beginning of the revival two years ago flew to Toronto and thereupon received it. Steve Hill the Evangelist who was the catalyst for the outpouring of the Brownsville blessing, on a fateful Fathers day 2 years ago, had also received the Toronto blessing by laying on of hands at a church in Brompton UK, prior to his ministering at the Brownsville church. The Brompton church was the center in the UK, for the spreading of the Toronto blessing, the pastor of that church having also received that blessing while attending the Toronto airport Vineyard church. So what we have is a move which began in Toronto moving into Pensacola via people who had received that particular blessing via laying on of hands, (Toronto and Brompton) and expropriating it to Brownsville. This is important to note, as it is really the source of the activities which are ongoing there.

Orchestrated Agenda?

Let me explain. Rev. Kilpatrick was speaking primarily to Assembly of God pastors that night, and he was instructing them to lay everything on the line for this revival, even to the point of going against their church boards, and as an example he shared with them his own experience. Before the outpouring of the Blessing occurred, Rev. Kilpatrick went to his board, and laid the keys to the church on the altar, saying,”If Brownsville, does not go for this revival, I’ll resign.” His wife and another board member made the same commitment. In essence, the Brownsville blessing was planned and orchestrated even before it occurred.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/wed1.htm

Pastors Orchestrated First Revival 

PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserve
Hill’s persistent urging pushed crowd to react

By Alice Crann
News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – For 2 1/2 years, the Rev. John Kilpatrick, pastor of Brownsville Assembly of God, and evangelist Steve Hill have promoted the Pensacola Brownsville Revival as a spontaneous arrival of the Holy Spirit on June 18, 1995. Kilpatrick also has repeatedly described the arrival of revival that day as “a mighty wind” that suddenly blew through the church. Everyone who was there felt it, he says. 

But videotape and statements of numerous people who were there indicate that nothing like that happened and the congregation in general was far from overwhelmed. 

In addition, say present and former church members, the revival did not suddenly arrive. They knew what Kilpatrick was setting up because in the months before the revival: 

  • He talked persistently about bringing revival to Brownsville and threatened to quit if the church did not accept the revival. 
  • The pastor’s wife, Brenda Kilpatrick, and a number of Brownsville church officials traveled to Canada and observed revival crowd-control techniques and prayer-team methods at the phenomenally successful ongoing revival there, the Toronto Blessing. 
  • Kilpatrick showed the congregation a video of a Toronto Blessing service, in which people fall to the floor, “slain in the spirit,” as they feel the Holy Spirit taking over them. 
  • Kilpatrick had followers of evangelist Rodney Howard-Browne attend a Brownsville service, where they functioned as an example of highly expressive worship. Howard-Browne, a dramatically energetic evangelist who calls himself the “Holy Ghost bartender,” is known for promoting the “holy laughter” phenomenon in which people succumb to hysterical convulsions. His followers did that at Brownsville. 
  • Kilpatrick invited Hill, an “on fire” evangelist whom Kilpatrick knew to be in search of a place to conduct a long-running, big revival to give the sermon on Father’s Day 1995.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/strange3.htm

CLAIM: Brownsville leaders claim the Pensacola “revival” began spontaneously on June 18, 1995.                

FACT: In the weeks prior to June 18 many key members of the Brownsville Assembly, including the pastor’s wife, visited Toronto, and they were earnestly seeking the same experiences for Brownsville. Prior to June 18 a video of the Toronto experiences was shown to the Pensacola congregation to encourage the congregation to desire the same thing. Prior to June 18, Pastor Kilpatrick talked persistently about bringing the Laughing Revival to Brownsville and threatened to quit if the church did not accept it (“Pastors orchestrated first revival Hill’s persistent urging pushed crowd to react,” Pensacola News Journal, Nov. 19, 1997). Pentecostal Evangelist Steve Hill was not randomly selected to speak at Brownsville on June 18. He was selected by Pastor Kilpatrick because Hills was earnestly desiring to be involved in the Laughing Revival and was searching for a place to conduct a long-running latter rain “revival.” Hills had recently sought the Laughing Revival anointing at Holy Trinity Brompton in London, England.

 http://op.50megs.com/ditc/mon2.htm

The Road To Revival 

Taken from – ‘Pastor’s visions launched his career’ 
PUBLISHED MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved

It is no secret how the revival came to Brownsville. Kilpatrick planned and prepared carefully. He led his congregation through two years of prayer for revival. He altered the focus of Sunday night services to concentrate on preparation for the revival. He brought in banners, organized prayer teams and assigned his wife, Brenda, the job of leading others in a call for revival. 

ttp://op.50megs.com/ditc/prod03.html

Catalytic ‘Prophecy’

Prophecy attributed to Korean Pastor Cho changed three times- It is interesting how a claim regarding a prophecy attributed to Korean Pastor Cho changed three times, each time becoming more specific until it identified Pensacola as the city where a “great end-time revival” w​ould break out and spread throughout the world. Actually, I had heard of that prophecy years before when we lived in Kentucky, and there was speculation that Evangel Tabernacle would be the church where it was to start. The prophecy didn’t change…the telling of it did. by Dr. Herb Babcock, Former Member of Brownsville Assembly Of God http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/prod03.html

1993 Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho’s  Prayer For Revival Initiates ‘Revival Prophecy’      https://discernmentministriesinternational.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/here-we-go-again/

According to the BAG mythology here is what they claimed took place. The Pensacola church has been divinely appointed by God to be the catalyst of revival according to some prophetic words given by a couple of recognized charismatic leaders. In 1993 Dr. Paul Cho, pastor of the world’s largest congregation in Korea was in the United States and was praying for revival:

He did so, and the Holy Spirit told him to point his finger at the map. As he did, he felt his finger drawn to the Florida panhandle and to the city of Pensacola. “I am going to send revival to the seaside city of Pensacola, and it will spread like a fire until all of America ha been consumed by it,” said the Lord to Dr. Cho, Dr. Cho shared his experience with others and the word predictably spread to many of the pastors in the Pensacola area. Some time later, a Mobile, Alabama, Church of God pastor (70 miles away from Pensacola) inquired of Dr. Cho. “Dr. Cho, there’s been a rumor that you have prophesied a great revival in America to begin in Pensacola, Florida. Is there any truth to this?” he asked. “No rumah! No rumah! No rumah! Said Dr. Cho in his broken English “Received vision; revival will com!” (2)

Cho’s “leading” of the Spirit sounds more like someone using a planchet on a Ouija board as opposed from hearing from God. Not to mention the fact that what Cho allegedly received from the Holy Spirit did not come to pass. The fire did not spread throughout all America, nor was all America consumed by it. The revival did spread to many charismatic and Pentecostal congregations and the fruit produced by it was nothing less than spiritual heartache, disappointment, church splits and fanaticism. (3) Secondly, I have personally sat under Cho’s preaching and his English is not broken, if anything, he speaks English better than many Americans, so the “broken English” is not true either. Make no mistake about it my friends, God is not inaccurate and His true prophets were absolutely correct when they spoke under the direction of the Holy Spirit. Cho was not hearing from the Holy Spirit, so his direction had to be coming from another source and given the paranormal way in which Cho describes this leading, we know that it had to be a demonic spirit that was his guide.

https://www1.cbn.com/spirituallife/what-happened-to-brownsville’s-fire http://www.theremnant.com/June04-29.html

Until Jesus Comes

At one point during the heyday of the movement, Korean pastor David Yonggi Cho announced from Brownsville’s pulpit that the revival “would last until Jesus comes.” Certainly the fruit of this revival will remain that long. But for those in Pensacola who were swept up in the ecstasy of those early years, and then endured splits, resignations, debts, and disappointments, the word “revival” now has a hollow ring to it.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/wed1.htm

The Beginning

Hill’s Persistent Urging Pushed Crowd To React

PENSACOLA – For 2 1/2 years, the Rev. John Kilpatrick, pastor of Brownsville Assembly of God, and evangelist Steve Hill have promoted the Pensacola Brownsville Revival as a spontaneous arrival of the Holy Spirit on June 18, 1995. Kilpatrick also has repeatedly described the arrival of revival that day as “a mighty wind” that suddenly blew through the church. Everyone who was there felt it, he says. 

But videotape and statements of numerous people who were there indicate that nothing like that happened and the congregation in general was far from overwhelmed. 

Contrived Suggestive Manipulation

The video shows what happened after Kilpatrick turned the stage over to Hill. Hill says: “Everyone who would like a refreshing from the Lord you’d like God to touch your life I want you to come forward, just stand right in here.” Hundreds move into the area in front of the stage. Hill: “Now if someone falls next to you, work with me, OK? Just work with me. If someone falls right in front of you, help them down to the ground.” Hill goes into the audience, touches people on the forehead with one or two fingers. In some cases, he uses his whole hand or puts his hands along side of people’s heads as he shouts: “Now Lord! More! More! More! Jesus! Now Lord! Fire! Fire! Fire! Fire! Now! Now Jesus! Fire! Now! Now!” Hill continues this for several minutes. He touches dozens of people. Most stand still. Nine fall down. 

Just a trickle

Hill gets back on stage, gestures to the choir to stop singing and says: “Listen, this is happening exactly like every one of our services. What is happening? It’s just a trickling going on. It’s almost like there’s a river going by and some of us are doing this (he demonstrates treading water). “Stay with what the Lord is doing. We’ve had the Lord move like this gently, and then the power of God hits, friends, and I want to tell you, it is the most spectacular presence of the Lord! “How many of you believe in the power of God? There’s people already down here, receiving from the Lord! Wait on the Lord right now! Go after the Lord!” Hill goes back in the audience and repeats his anointings and chants for several more minutes. No one moves or falls down. He gets back on stage. Hill: “The Lord just spoke to me right here in this section. I want everyone right here to go after the Lord right now. Go after the Lord.” Hill again goes back down into the audience and rapidly moves around, touching dozens of people on the head. Six fall down. Most watch curiously or continue praying. 

Confusion reigns

Kilpatrick takes the microphone from the pulpit and announces he is seeing something wonderful occur. “I’ve never experienced anything like it!” Many in the audience look confused. Hill hurries back on stage and says: “Pastor! Some of you, if you had any idea what the Lord is about to do for you! Just get back! I’ve had God hit people already in this place thrown them to the ground! They’re in heaven right now! They’re not in Pensacola they’re in heaven right now! Just stay open to the Lord!” 

A number of people start to leave the church. Hill shouts: “Don’t leave! Don’t leave!” He hurries into the audience and again begins laying on hands. Four people fall down. He gets on stage again and says: “Hey! It’s getting deeper, friends! It’s getting deeper! Getting deeper! Don’t leave! We’ve had the Lord pour out His Holy Spirit en masse! He just came down in the meeting! Don’t leave! Sweet Jesus! Sweet Jesus!” Hill goes back into the audience. Two men and one woman fall after his touch. He takes hold of a man, puts one hand on his head, the other on his shoulder, and shakes him. 

Kilpatrick falls

It is at this point that Kilpatrick falls down. The videotape shows that he trips as he steps backward up onto the stage. He puts out a hand to break his fall, drops into a sitting position, pauses a moment, then lies back. He does not get up until after the video ends. Hill pays no heed. He goes up to a man who is shaking and shouts into his face, “More, more!” Hill leads the man up onto the stage and backs away from him. He waves his hands at him, and yells: “Jesus! Jesus! Jesus! Jesus! Jesus! Jesus! More! More! More! More! More! More! Fire! Fire! Fire!” for several minutes. The man does not fall down. Instead, with his head bowed he walks past Hill toward the steps. Hill and another man grab him and take him back to the pulpit. Hill asks him: “What’s happening?” The man, eyes closed, speaks unintelligibly. 

Hill walks away, and the man leaves the stage weeping. 

Hill then says: “Friends, let me explain something. We may pray with you, and you think, ‘Well, nothing happened.’ “No, no, no, no, no, no! No, no, no, no, no, no! That’s not what God is into.” Hill talks some more, referring to some of his previous services when people did not think anything was happening but “the voltage of electricity was just flowing there.” “Some of you are thinking, ‘The way this thing is going, I’m never going to get prayed for.’ Friends, let me tell you what I’ve seen happen. As the people wait on the Lord as they wait on the Lord there have been times when I have turned to a crowd, and literally just walked through, and everyone was just hit everywhere by the power of God, ’cause they waited on the Lord. 

Hill talks some more, touches a child and she falls down. He immediately lifts her back to her feet and says: “Did you lose all your strength?” The girl nods. Hill gets back on stage and motions the singers to stop. Hill says: “I want all the children! Make room right here for all the little kids. “Now, kids. I want all you children to look at me. …OK, I’m going to be praying for you, OK? Some of you are going to be filled with the Holy Spirit! “One little girl who was 8 years old her parents brought her to me I touched her, she went to the ground, her hands went up, she began speaking in tongues, and her mom and dad went bananas! I mean they just they were sitting there watching her, filled with the Holy Ghost instantly! “I’m going to pray for you, you’re going to fall to the ground. Don’t worry about it. You’re going to love it. The Lord is touching your life. Hill begins touching the heads of the children, occasionally touching some adults. After several minutes, five adults and one little girl fall down. 

Hill leaves the children and goes back to the adults. This time, more people begin to fall. The crowd has thinned. Many have left the building or returned to their pews. Hill suddenly falls down with a loud cry. He moans and cries out, then quickly gets up. After some more anointings he goes back to the platform. He says: “I like it when the crowd starts thinning out. Then the Lord starts coming down. 

Praying for the people

Pointing to his left, Hill says: “God has just moved over here! Lord, have mercy! I want to pray with every single person now! How many of you kids have been prayed for? Did God touch your life?” Nobody responds. Hill points to someone out of view and says: “Reconstructed his life!” Again, he goes back into the audience. Since Hill began, two hours have passed. Most of the congregation has left. The tape fades to black. 

Kilpatrick and Hill’s ecstatic reports about the wonders of that day have gained nationwide attention and since that time have brought hundreds of thousands of people to the revival. Kilpatrick says: “When I fell on the floor, it was the most life-changing experience. Steve was beside himself because he was under a powerful anointing. “It may look foolish when watching the video, but a nation will not come to a place if the Lord is really not there. “Every night we walk into that church we say: ‘Lord. Will you do it one more time?’ If we could manufacture that, we would be really hot items.” 

Nothing Really Extraordinary Happened

Albert James Dager, who writes Media Spotlight, a Christian watchdog newsletter, based in Redmond, Wash., said he closely viewed the video of the Father’s Day service and observed that “nothing really extraordinary happened.” Media Spotlight is nondenominational, nonprofit and indepen conversion not Christdent. For 20 years conversion not Christ it has been providing a Biblical analysis of Christian messages appearing in the media. University religion departments, Bible scholars, theologians and some 5,000 pastors of many denominations subscribe. Dager said that viewing the tape, “I felt sorry for Steve Hill. He was working so hard to get something to happen, prompting the people, telling them what great things they were going to witness and experience. “Any objective person would have been embarrassed for him.” 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/strange3.htm

Falsified Exagerations

CLAIM: Brownsville leaders claim that on June 18 a mighty wind blew through the church, that it affected everyone present, that great numbers of people fell to the floor, that it was a mighty supernatural move of God.

FACT: The video recording of the June 18 service and testimonies of people who were there disprove the claims. It is very evident, in fact, that the events were highly manipulated by Evangelist Steve Hill. When he first invited people to come forward for the laying on of hands, only nine people fell, but Hill continued to cajole the crowd. Eventually another six fell, then a few more. It all appears to be manipulated by Hill. In fact, so little happened in spite of Hill’s shouting and demanding and wheedling, it is embarrassing. When people began to leave the church, Hill shouted at them not to leave. In apparent desperation Hill called for all the children to come forward. He told them that he was going to pray for them and they were going to fall to the ground. In spite of his prodding, only one little girl fell down.

The Brownsville meeting seemed clearly obsessed with the Charismatic “phenomenon” referred to as being “slain in the spirit.” Everything in the service that night was preparatory to and subservient to this unusual ritual, which one would have a difficult time defining and supporting from the Bible. The evangelist even mocked his would-be critics, saying that he would spend a few minutes looking at “Three Rules for Daily Living” found in Paul’s letters to Timothy, so that no one could accuse him of not basing his message on the Bible. He thought it was funny…I was saddened at such a de-emphasis of God’s Truth.
 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/grace.htm

A Lot Of “Coaching” Going

“I also noticed that there was a lot of “coaching” going on prior to the invitation. Visitors were told that they needed to have an open mind…that they might not receive anything from the Lord on the first night…that they needed to wait patiently on the Lord even if it meant staying until three in the morning…that they should react without thinking about it (the evangelist called this “immediate obedience to the Holy Spirit” and gave an object lesson to demonstrate what he meant), and that not everyone would necessarily fall down as a sign of God’s work in their life. Add to this mixture an upbeat, loud and hard-driving rock tempo with repetitious words which went on and on, plus the factor of physical and mental exhaustion which sets in after four or five hours (much less night after night), plus the pent-up expectation of witnessing or participation in the “miraculous”–it’s a recipe for deception and misrepresentation.”

Manifestations In The mix

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/pensa3.html

Eye Witness Testimonies: 
REPORT DATE:  4 FEB 1997.

FROM:  MRS BARBARA L. (-USA).

“Finally, the meeting began with worship. My excitement and enthusiasm quickly vanished. Something seemed very wrong to me. I thought maybe I was expecting too much. The worship was very typical of the modern contemporary worship that I had been accustomed to, most of the songs familiar, but something didn’t seem right in the Spirit.

Then the manifestations began. Young girls walking around gesturing as though they were mentally ill. One of the worship leaders, a female, collapsed on the floor during the worship where she remained for a long time. I kept telling myself.. keep an open mind. I kept asking God.. is this you.. if this is you, give me a peace in my spirit. It never came.

As the speakers began to share, I became increasing disturbed. They spoke of the mystical appearance of the river on that fateful Sunday in June of 1995 and how its power swept into the building and changed everything. They went on and on about manifestations, particularly about bizarre behaviors in which they believed they were birthing things through intercession. The pastor’s wife spoke and the entire time she was on the platform she jerked uncontrollably as she told stories of phenomenon. Finally, I could stand it no longer. I looked at my family and said let’s get out of here. They were quick to agree. I left the materials that I had purchased on the church parking lot. I didn’t even want to take them in my car… This is deception and I believe with all my heart that the spirit operating at Pensacola is a religious spirit, a counterfeit spirit…They talked about the river, they talked about manifestations of power… the Spirit of God inside me did not bear witness that this”revival” was of Him.”

FROM: NEAL & DARLEEN H. (-USA). “A group from our church, including our pastor, visited the Brownsville Assembly of God. We had heard about all the lost souls that were supposedly getting saved, and how wonderfully God was supposedly moving. We genuinely thought this was going to be a really great move of God…

As I sat there in the balcony, I couldn’t help noticing all the weird, strange things people around me were doing. I thought “there surely area lot people here with nervous tics, and Parkinson’s disease.” I truly thought that was what was the matter with them. But, I felt so uneasy, like something wasn’t right, yet I couldn’t figure out what it was. Well some of these people whom I thought had a nervous tic began to get worse as the service progressed, and some began to laugh and scream – a blood curdling scream. It was at this point of the service that I decided that all these people were demon opressed, and didn’t have nervous tics at all. It was quite a disturbing thought as there were so many of them, and I thought I’ve never seen anything like this in all my life!!!! I closed my eyes and prayed “Dear Lord please let this be the night these people are delivered from this horrible demonic oppression. In Jesus name, Amen.”

Steve Hill got up to preach, and mostly told stories, showed us his dictionary that he’d bought with scriptures in it, told us not toanalyze this “move of God”, and that we’d better receive it if we didn’t want a stamp of disapproval from Jesus. I sat there as he was speaking thinking “this man’s words are dead, there is absolutely no anointing on him – none.” I was still trying to figure out what was wrong with this whole picture when our pastor got up from the choir where he was sitting, and walked up to the balcony where the rest of us were. It was very obvious that he was greatly disturbed and he said to us “we’ve got to get out of here, there is something really wrong,” we all agreed!! all of us managed to get out to the parking lot where our pastor told usthat the strange, wicked looking movements we were seeing in the balcony were in fact happening all through the audience. Our pastor said that the true Holy Spirit impressed strongly that we should not let them lay hands on us, for the spirit that was causing all the epileptic type symptoms and chicken walking etc. is passed by the laying on of hands. The Holy Spirit impressed strongly that we were not only to leave , but that we were to never go back.

It was like we had somehow fallen into a real life horror movie!!!! still can hardly believe what I saw with my own eyes… Those people are not being saved; they can say the sinner’s prayer all day long, but unless the true Holy Spirit is there to do the work of regeneration they cannot be saved. The Spirit of the Lord must draw a person to Christ, and He was not there… This is the great deception…”

REPORT DATE: 26 FEB 1997.
FROM: MR MICHAEL O. (-USA).
[This is an eyewitness account of what occurred when ‘Brownsville’ began to flood into the church that this gentleman attends]. In September of 1996 the board of elders in our church sent the senior pastor away for a much needed sabbatical (about a month). As best as I am aware, he spent two weeks on vacation somewhere in Florida and two weeks at, you guessed it, Brownsville Assembly of God. He and his wife came back in very jovial moods. His wife testified how God had delivered her from depression. They both testified how they had been slain in the spirit many times during the two weeks they were there. After he returned others began to go to Brownsville. Honestly, Ihadn’t noticed anything strange about these folks. Contrariwise, they seemed to be more open in their worship to God.

Last Sunday (3 days ago), several young people returned from Browns-ville. Three of the young ladies (16 year old range) exhibited “the jerks” and “writhing like a snake” manifestations. Neither one of these girls would have ever acted like this before, and two of them were down right shy! These were manifested in our Sunday evening service and they were not in control of themselves. They sat in their pews looking as though they belonged in a mental institution. Many in the congregation were laughing at what they saw. I confess, I started to laugh also but did my best to hold it in not deeming the situation that funny. On Monday morning during the opening exercises at the church school (grades 1-12, A.C.E.), my daughter told me that the normal 15 minute opening exercises lasted over two hours during which the manifestations of the previous mentioned three girls were passed over to many in the school. My wife, after hearing this, became very disturbed and concerned and requested of me that both she and I would attend the opening exercises on Tuesday, ie. yesterday. The school went through their pledges, etc and then the pastor preached. His sermon dealt with getting more of God but to get more of God one would have to get all their sins under the blood, deny themselves completely, and make themselves or put themselves in the way of a blessing.

He mentioned that a hindrance to the blessings of God would be if the students thought: “What would people think if I started “jerking” or got “slain the spirit”. This was quite emphasized even though all the while the pastor would inject that “this isn’t about manifestations”. He also emphasized how the children would be playing a big part in th revival that was to start in our church. Well, the sermon ended and then the music started and the altar call began with one student after another going up to the altar. One thing that was very disturbing is that only one song was played, a 30 second piece that goes “Anointing,fall on me, anointing fall on me, let the power of the Holy Ghost falon me, anointing fall on me.” Remember that the altar call lasted atleast one hour with this song being played over and over just like a MANTRA! The manifestations began again, beginning with the girls I previously described and then passing from them over to other children. Several began to jerk, especially the girls. Why the girls? The children just went from one to another laying hands on one another. Beyond what I witnessed on Sunday evening, the following manifestations were seen: Uncontrollable weeping, staggering, unable to stand, stuck to the floor, writhing like a serpent, crawling on hands and knees, mooing, exhaustion. These manifestations are given as manifestations among those involved with kundalini/shakti on a chart that I have in front of me. After at least an hour of this, the children went back to their pews, but not until the music had stopped of course, and they just sat there, quiet, not saying a word for at least another 1/2 hour. One of the original three girls stood up and said this was a sovereign work of God, crying all the time. One of the school teachers said that it was good for the kids to be resting now, that it was good to rest after having been in the presence of the Lord.

My daughters are not in school today and they won’t be in school anymore until this thing is settled. This is crazy. I’v experiencedGod’s power, I’ve experienced being baptized with the Holy Ghost, but never in my life did such experiences leave me exhausted or in a state of bewilderment like these young people seemed to be in…

Ambassador Undercover – https://books.google.ca › booksDavid Scott

“At the time the “revival” in Pensacola became the latest fad to follow, our daughter attended a youth group at a church where half the teenagers went to Pensacola to attend the meetings. All of them were genuinely on fire for God before they went. None of them were sinful backsliders. After they returned from Florida, however, all the girls were whores or lesbians and all the boys were whoremongers or homosexuals. All of them were rebellious toward their parents too. We mentioned this to some friends in Christchurch, whose son visited the Pensacola church. They told us their son, who was previously very close to them, returned with such a spirit of rebellion that they wouldn’t allow him to stay at home.”

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/prod03.html

Only Prayers For -“More, Lord!”

I was included in the prayer teams until we disassociated ourselves from BAG. While on the prayer team, we were instructed to NOT pray in Jesus’ name. We were told to NOT pray for the needs of people. The only thing we were to do was touch people on their forehead and say, “More, Lord!” and keep repeating that until there was an “impartation” of the spirit being promoted in the meetings. If the person did not respond in a reasonable time, move on to someone else. Any deviation from the limited procedure would result in being removed from the prayer team, which did happen to a few individuals.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/tue1.htm

Hills Bio Fraught With Fallacies – Revival Leader Admits He Inflated Stories

PUBLISHED TUESDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1997 Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved     By John W. Allman -News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – Working the stage four nights a week at Brownsville Assembly of God, his blue eyes blazing and his right leg pumping like a piston, Steve Hill relates to people by firing off snippets of Scripture interspersed with images from his own life. 

One of his favorite message topics is: “Each man writes his own legacy.” Hill has already endeavored to write his. It is his autobiography, “Stone Cold Heart,” that colorfully details his ascent from a life of crime and drugs. 

Night after night at the Pensacola Brownsville Revival, Hill repeats those same stories about his past, quoting many of the details in his book. 

But the facts of his past often differ from what he says and what he wrote. 

  • The self-proclaimed “former junkie” and “heroin addict” was never a heroin addict. 
  • The man who says that from 1972 to 1975 he was arrested “13 times” has only three arrests on his record in his hometown of Huntsville, Ala. 
  • After graduating from high school in 1972, Hill said he wandered the country for three years, working odd jobs and using and selling drugs. 
  • In his autobiography, Hill says he was expelled from high school and implies it happened more than once. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/tue2.htm

PUBLISHED TUESDAY NOVEMBER 20, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved
By John W. Allman News Journal staff writer 

Hill’s Boasts Often Exaggerate The Facts

Hill’s enthusiasm for his success and his mission supersede that message. The way his eyes gleam as he describes enemies he has attracted through his evangelism, the way his fist pumps as he cites the number of people he has saved, the way his voice resonates as he describes himself as God’s messenger all suggest he is a man who takes pride in what he does and who he is. The stories come fast and furious. His blue eyes often brim with tears and just as often blaze with intensity. He tells countless stories of his past, casting them as freshly recalled anecdotes though they come verbatim from his books and sermons. He also tells present-day stories, casting them in vague details and dramatic references for which he provides no documentation. He says there are businessmen who want him dead because he saved a stripper who also worked as a prostitute. He says covens of witches have threatened him and even sent a gunwoman from Mississippi, armed with silver bullets, to kill him. 

Yet, there is much he does not say. He does not argue when people draw comparisons between him and Jesus Christ. He does not disclose what he has done with one-third of the $2.2 million his ministry collected over the last year. He does not expound beyond his scripted life story unless he is confronted with contradictory evidence. He says no one in the media who interviewed him in the last two years closely questioned his account of his past; instead, he says, each one became a friend and a believer. 

When the News Journal asked him to clear up contradictions between what he says about himself and what police and court records show and between his self-description and others’ description of him he had no ready answers. After the News Journal interview, Hill asked his mother and his attorney to call the News Journal and dispute the record. 

The News Journal, during a four-month investigation of the revival and its leaders, interviewed people whom Hill said played an important role at every stage of his life. Each told a story far different from the one Hill wrote in his autobiography, “Stone Cold Heart.” The young man they remember is unlike the young man Hill says he was. They tell of a bright boy who was an average student. 

They tell of a business-minded teen-ager with a creative flair who was capable of convincing others to follow him, no matter what. 

Steve Hill’s older sister, Marcia Pate, 47, who lives in Huntsville, had already graduated when Steve entered high school, but she remembers him as a typical kid brother. He was closer to his younger sister, Susan, who went from fighting with him on the playground to assisting him on profitable “trash night” expeditions. She says Steve would take her around the neighborhood, picking up “good stuff” that people threw out. “Steve was awesome,” recalls Susan Hill, now 40. “When he was in high school, he was business-minded,” said Susan Hill, remembering a time when her brother ordered a kit to make yo-yos that would glow in the dark. She sat and helped him put them together so he could sell them at nearby Grissom High School. Hill remembers that differently. He says he did make the yo-yos but he put drugs inside them. Yo-yos with drugs cost $10; those without cost $2. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/tue4.htm

Criminal Record Not What He Says It Is 

By John W. Allman
News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – Steve Hill depicts his youth as a troubled time of drug addiction and crime. He tells of frequent problems in school, extended jail stays, random criminal acts and a never-ending flow of drugs. In his autobiography, “Stone Cold Heart,” Hill writes of running wild in the streets of Huntsville, Ala., in the early 1970s, doing all kinds of drugs and getting arrested frequently. 

Hill claims that he was:

  • Expelled from high school. 
  • Arrested at least 13 times between high school graduation in 1972 and December 1975. 
  • Sentenced to short jail terms or probation by a number of judges.

But much of what Hill describes cannot be verified. And his stories differ from what others recall. 

Hill blames the passage of time for that: Since the events happened more than 20 years ago, he says, people have forgotten some facts and specific details. But even the police, court and school records differ from his accounts. 

Hill wrote in “Stone Cold Heart”: 

I was constantly being led down the school corridors to the principal’s office. Expelled from school again!

Hill graduated from Grissom High School in 1972. His senior class, had 547 students. Few of Hill’s teachers are still there. Edna Keel, who taught economics and psychology, said she remembers him only because of his hair, which was longer than most other students. “He always kept it neat,” she said. In the early 1970s, it was not uncommon for schools to have an assistant principal assigned to handle discipline. At Grissom High, that was Ray Reynolds. “I never had any serious problems with Steve,” said Reynolds, 60, who now teaches American history at Sparkman High School in Huntsville. “He was the usual high school kid in the ’70s.” Reynolds used a paddle to enforce the rules. He remembers paddling Hill, but only for minor offenses such as being late for school. Hill said in a recent interview that Reynolds paddled him because he had drugs. Reynolds said he never disciplined Hill for drugs. 

Hill admitted in an interview with the News Journal that he was never expelled from Grissom. But he claims he passed out in the school cafeteria after taking Quaaludes, a depressant, and school officials had to call his mother to pick him up. After the News Journal interview, Hill had his mother, Ann, call the newspaper to verify that she picked him up at school. 

Hill wrote in “Stone Cold Heart”: 

The cycle of drugs-crime-jail, drugs-crime-jail repeated over and over only to be stopped by death itself.

In the early 1970s, the population of Huntsville was almost 140,000. The drug culture of the late 1960s was just surfacing in the northern Alabama city, nestled just below the Tennessee state line. It caught many people, especially local law enforcement officials, by surprise. 

The Huntsville Police Department created a drug unit in 1969 to battle what it said were the three most common drugs: marijuana, LSD and Dilaudid. 

The city did not have a significant problem with what police considered the hard drugs: heroin and cocaine, Huntsville police officials said. 

Hill, however, has described the city of his youth as a haven for hard-drug use. His favorite, he said, was morphine. In his sermons, he has called himself a junkie, but now says the truth is that he tried heroin only a few times. “I don’t ever want to depict myself as what you would call a mainline heroin addict,” Hill said. 

Hill’s depictions of his criminal past also raise questions. He uses vague terms when he mentions his arrests. Though he claims police took him to jail in Colorado, Arizona and California, as well as in Alabama, he can offer no proof that any arrest outside Alabama ever happened. His explanation is that many were for crimes that were never solved. 

Hill’s attorney, Walter Chandler, suggests that some were not actual arrests but were instances in which Hill was picked up for questioning. 

One story Hill has told on stage numerous times is that he and some friends were arrested “for breaking into a drug store” in Madison, Ala. That arrest is not on his record. National law enforcement reports, Huntsville police records and Madison County Court records together show four arrests: two on drug charges, in 1974 and 1975; two on charges of attempting to break into an automobile, in 1973 and 1975. Hill’s record shows he was convicted of only one charge: possession and sale of Dilaudid, a pain-reliever. 

Hill wrote in “Stone Cold Heart”: 

Without any direction, I began to hitchhike around the country. Wherever I could find shelter became my home in caves, under bridges, in the desert, and in street missions.

After high school graduation, Hill said, he took to the road for three years, criss-crossing the country from the East to West Coast and back again. Yet from Sept. 21, 1973 to March 4, 1975, Hill was employed full time in Huntsville at John Blue Farm Equipment Co., making castings for farm equipment in the foundry. The foundry has since closed, but the business is still open. Company employment records show no indication that he missed work. He left he was not fired in 1975, the file shows. Hill said recently he did work at John Blue but spent a majority of the time hitchhiking through Arizona, California and Colorado. He said he worked odd jobs in Colorado and also at a convenience store. 

Hill cannot explain how he was capable of traveling so much while working a full-time job. “I don’t remember all the details. In Stone Cold Heart,’ I don’t say dates. It was a total blur,” Hill said. “I knew I worked for John Blue.” 

Hill wrote in “Stone Cold Heart”: 

No longer did I even try to lie and connive my way to get the judge to let me off from punishment for my crimes. This was partly because I usually didn’t remember what I had done under the influence of narcotics to end up in jail. Yet somehow, the judges seemed not to want to waste the taxpayers’ money on me and usually just gave me a short jail sentence or probation.

Judge John David Snodgrass remembers Steve Hill. 

Snodgrass, 59, was a circuit court judge in Madison County in 1976 when Hill appeared before him on two counts of possession and sale of LSD and two counts of possession and sale of Dilaudid. The judge dismissed three counts and convicted Hill on one. 

Enter Jim Summers. Summers had moved to Huntsville in 1968 and established Outreach Ministries of Alabama Inc. The nonprofit organization was designed to help kids on drugs learn to live a spiritual life. Summers had met Hill once before at a Friday night Outreach service but the two did not become friends until Hill was in jail, waiting to go to court. Summers said he felt a calling to help Hill; he began lobbying Snodgrass to release Hill to his ministry. Snodgrass reluctantly agreed. The county was looking for alternative ways to provide for offenders. “It seemed like a good test proposition for Summers to see if that was going to be a workable situation,” Snodgrass said. 

Snodgrass sentenced Hill to two years in the state penitentiary but changed it to two years of probation with the condition that Hill complete a Christian-based treatment program called Teen Challenge. 

Hill spent 3 months with Summers in Huntsville, then was sent to Cape Girardeau, Mo., for eight months of Bible study in Teen Challenge. 

When he completed that program, Hill entered a one-year program at Twin Oaks Academy in Lindale, Texas, headed by David Wilkerson, founder of Teen Challenge. The school is now closed and Wilkerson has since founded Times Square Church/World Challenge Inc. in Manhattan. When he finished at Twin Oaks, Hill was hired by Summers’ ministry to work with prisoners in Huntsville. He did that for four years, and said he often worked with Snodgrass to find ways to help drug offenders. 

Snodgrass, however, said he has seen Hill only once since the day he sentenced him. That was a few years ago when Hill visited Huntsville while taking a break from his missionary work in South America. Hill cannot explain why the judge’s account differs from his. 

“Whether he remembers it or not is up to him,” Hill said. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/tue3.htm

Money For Missions Fails To Add Up 

PUBLISHED TUESDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved

By John W. Allman and J. Lowe Davis
News Journal staff writers 

PENSACOLA – Evangelist Steve Hill says he has poured money into a multitude of foreign missions and charities. His attorney, Walter Chandler, specifically mentioned three, including an orphanage in San Nicolas, Argentina. But when the News Journal called the orphanage for details, staff members said they have not heard from Hill in 10 years. They asked the News Journal for Hill’s address so they could write him and ask for a donation. 

Many missions that Hill mentions cannot be reached to confirm his giving because he does not provide addresses, phone numbers or other forms of contact. The News Journal reached the orphanage by contacting the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, which found contacts and phone numbers that eventually led to the orphanage. 

Hill is fondly remembered at the orphanage he was in a mission group that built it in the 1980s, said Betina Fernandez, executive secretary to orphanage director Pastor Omar de Felipe. Fernandez, who said she has never met Hill, spoke highly of him for helping create the orphanage, the Asociacion Civil Hogar Evangelico El Amanecer. It provides beds, food, counseling, medical treatment and schooling for 70 children. It relies on government funds, Fernandez said. 

Hill’s stories about his ministry’s benevolence help inspire the Friday night Brownsville Revival crowds to give generously $100 apiece is the amount the revival leaders ask. Asked for specifics about his giving through his ministry, Together in the Harvest, Hill and his attorney gave the News Journal two different financial statements showing three different totals for his giving to missions. None of those three totals match the list and total on the ministry’s IRS return. 

The different figures are: 

  • $900,000 – On his ministry’s financial statement, Hill noted: “75 percent of Friday night offerings are allocated for foreign and home missions.” Hill’s ministry receives the entire collection every Friday night at the Brownsville Revival. That amounted to “about $1.2 million” for the ministry from August 1996 to August 1997, so 75 percent would be $900,000. 
  • $789,689 – Elsewhere on the financial statement, Hill provided Hill said that 31 percent, or $789,689, of the ministry’s total budget of $2.2 million went to foreign and domestic missions. It did not list the missions. 
  • $639,383 – Hill’s attorney provided a missions list for the same time period. It said $639,384 went to missions and Teen Challenge centers in 17 foreign countries and two American states. Some missions were named, most were not and were identified only as a country. Some were designated as “Ministerial giving” and “Pastoral.” The list identified three Teen Challenge centers in Florida as receiving $18,260. Officials in the Teen Challenge Florida headquarters, however, said only that Hill has contributed to several Florida centers. They declined to say how much Hill has contributed or where the money went. 
  • $102,212 The IRS return states that Together in the Harvest gave $102,212 about 9 percent of its revenue of $1,187,519 to “ministry/outreach.” By comparison, $421,438, or 35 percent, was the year-end unused balance.

Hill and his attorney both said they did not know whether the IRS return was for the 1996 calendar year or for the same August to August fiscal year as the two other financial statements. The return does not specify the time period, but it was dated Aug. 12 and received Aug. 19. 

Hill has emphatically reassured revival audiences that their donation to Together in the Harvest will be well-spent. He has often said to the audience, “our books are open” and “there is nothing to hide.” “Don’t get blown out of the saddle when someone asks you for a missions offering, Hill said to the crowd at the Friday night revival Sept 26. “You should get blown out of the saddle you should and you’d have every right to if the money is being squandered.” 

In a recent interview with the News Journal, Hill said that in 1984 he asked the Assemblies of God headquarters in Springfield, Mo., to send him into the mission field. In 1985, Hill and his wife went to Costa Rica to learn Spanish. In 1986, they moved to Buenos Aires. While in Argentina, Hill said, he watched and learned from revival leaders like Carlos Anaconda, credited with inspiring the Great Argentine Revival.Hill said he traveled back to the United States periodically to raise money, then returned to Argentina to use that money to build churches. “I was the one. I would go to a city. I would pray over the city. Someone’s got to be leading this thing, and so I was the one doing that,” Hill said. One of his crowning achievements, he said, is the Evangelistic Center in Neuquen, Argentina. 

Hill and Pastor Hector Ferreyra started the church 10 years ago in Ferreyra’s garage, according to The Sheaf Report, a newsletter mailed out by Together in the Harvest. The church now has a multi-use building with a gymnasium, a 3,500-seat sanctuary and eight dining rooms, according to Pastor Oscar Revelino, who said he and Ferreyra are members of an Assemblies of God union in Argentina. Revelino  said the church feeds 800 children per week in its dining rooms and ministers to about 10,000 children on the street. Revelino said Hill has “helped with money,” but said he did not have figures. Revelino said the News Journal needed to speak to the church’s accountant, but he did not identify the accountant. Hill’s financial statement shows his ministry sent $137,084 to Argentina between Aug. 1, 1996, and Aug. 1, 1997. 

On a videotape of the Sept. 26 revival, Hill said he has sent $45,000 to Ferreyra to buy an abandoned movie theater in Cipoletti, Argentina; $30,000 to a Bible school in Argentina; and, he said, he has been sending $3,000 a month to Colombia to help establish a Teen Challenge center. The ministry’s IRS return, however, does not list any of these places as receiving money. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/mon1.htm

Kilpatrick Rules Over Revival 

PUBLISHED MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved


Revival provides pastor with luxury lifestyle

By John W. Allman News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – Pastor John Kilpatrick likes to be in control of his congregation. He has said so in his sermons, on revival videotapes and in his autobiography. Whether it is leading his people in prayer for revival or denouncing dissenters from his pulpit, Kilpatrick has made it clear he is in charge. In the 2 1/2 years since the Pensacola Brownsville Revival began, however, Kilpatrick has yielded to a higher power. 

He says he has seen visions — angels, healing bubbles, strange projectiles — that he cannot explain. He has talked to God. God has talked to him. Kilpatrick has found himself addressing his congregation in an unfamiliar language — not quite speaking in tongues, yet not quite English. He acknowledges that God powers the car, but it is clear that Kilpatrick is still at the wheel. He has refused to disclose his salary, not even to his own congregation, although pastors in most other denominations readily make that information known. 

He has used his pulpit to prophesize dire retribution against revival critics. He has told people who left his church they were “devil possessed” even though some were his strong supporters before the revival began. The News Journal, during a four-month investigation of the revival and its leaders, has found other things that Kilpatrick likes besides control: 

  • Privacy — Kilpatrick said he moved his family to Seminole Landing, in Baldwin County, Ala., in 1996 to get away from revival-goers who, he said, constantly drove by his Pensacola home. He has an unlisted phone number and he no longer keeps office hours at the church, opting instead to work in his home, at a location he did not disclose to his congregation until three days after the News Journal questioned him. 
  • Property — Kilpatrick and his wife, Brenda, have taken out a $300,000 mortgage for two acres in Donovan’s Landing, also in Baldwin County, where they are building an expansive home and a towering two-story garage-guest house. The Kilpatricks also have a $200,000 mortgage on their present home. 
  • Possessions — Kilpatrick’s newly created nonprofit corporation, Feast of Fire Ministries Inc., bought him a $310,000 motor coach last year to use for travel because he does not like to fly. 

Kilpatrick dismisses criticism of his lifestyle. 

“I have always strived to set an example by not living above the means of my people,” he said in an interview with the News Journal. 

A number of neighbors, former friends and former church members disagree. While they are willing to talk about his excesses, and in most cases provide documentation, they insisted they not be named because they fear retaliation. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/mon4.htm

Kilpatrick Takes Hard Line Against Dissenters 

PUBLISHED MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved

By John W. Allman and Amie K. Streater News Journal staff writers 

PENSACOLA – The magnetic, persuasive pastor of the Brownsville Assembly of God inspires hundreds to hurry to the altar to be saved. 

He wanted revival and he got it — and along with it he received international fame, wealth and adoration. He is revered and respected, but he is also repudiated. He is a man of God, but also a man to be feared and avoided, say neighbors, former friends and members of his own congregation. 

Since the revival began in June 1995, Kilpatrick has seen many members of his church — Brownsville Assembly of God — walk out. 

Some he has cast out, ordering them not to return. Reason: They either did not agree with the revival and its manifestations and impartations — passing on of the Holy Spirit through the preachers’ touch — or they were not living their lives the way Kilpatrick thought they should. “He just has a real critical and judgmental attitude toward people he considers to be in sin — which is not Christ-oriented at all,” said a woman who left after years of faithful attendance. “The message of love is not there,” she said. 

Kilpatrick can be a good pastor and a kind man, another former member said. 

There was one time several years ago that she needed advice and called him. He prayed with her and showed her examples of Scripture to comfort her, she recalled. “He said, ‘This is for you,’ ” she said. “That really encouraged me.” But she has seen the pastor’s other side, which is one reason she asked not to be identified when interviewed. Kilpatrick, she said, is not a man you can “agree to disagree” with. There is one way — his way — that he expects members of his congregation to follow. “There’s no, ‘We’re all part of God’s kingdom,’ ” she said. “There’s none of that.” 

Kilpatrick has taught his flock to think within very strict confines, she said. Anyone with a different attitude is encouraged to leave or change. “If you’re not within those confines, then they’ll pray for you to come back into the fold,” she said. 

Kilpatrick’s dealings with his neighbors also draw criticism. The pastor acknowledges he has been in a property dispute since he moved into a home in Seminole Landing, Ala., last fall. Jeanie Bettcher, who lives in Winnipeg, Canada, owns the lot next to the house Kilpatrick bought last year from a Brownsville Assembly of God member. Bettcher is planning to build her retirement home on her Seminole Landing lot. But she said she has had trouble getting a construction loan because the lot has an encroachment. When she visited her lot earlier this year, she saw that Kilpatrick was parking his 40-foot-long bus on her lot and using part of her land as a driveway for the bus. Kilpatrick concedes that, but blames the person from whom he bought his home — a member of his church. “The detached garage was already there. The previous owner built it over the set back line.” 

Bettcher complains that Kilpatrick not only used part of Bettcher’s land as a driveway and parking pad, he had a crew cut down a stand of oak trees on her property because the trees were blocking his view of a pond, put a concrete picnic table on her property and had landscapers use railroad ties to terrace part of her land. Kilpatrick says he had just one of her trees cut down, and he says the terrace and table were a mistake. “I had some landscapers come out here because the back is steep. I had them put in railroad ties. When they did this, they went in on her property. So I had to get that all moved.” 

Bettcher recently had other Erin Pond neighbors go to her property and put yellow tape along the front and side adjacent to Kilpatrick’s. The tape says: “No trespassing.” 

By coincidence, Bettcher recently learned that she is part-owner of a Pensacola property adjacent to Kilpatrick’s church and that the church may be encroaching on that property. Brownsville Assembly of God is building a large Family Life Center on land next to property that Bettcher and her aunts recently inherited. Construction on the Family Life Center has been at a standstill for more than a month because of the dispute over the property line. Associate Pastor Carey Robertson explained the situation as “discrepancies in the surveys.” He said the church is not encroaching and has turned the matter over to its attorneys. Bettcher is adamant about not giving the church an inch for free, not after her experience with Kilpatrick over the Seminole Landing property. 

“He doesn’t appear to be remorseful,” she said. 

http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/kilpatrick.html

If You Want To Be Intimidated And Lampooned, Go To Brownsville

 Question: Is the Spirit manifested bringing truth and greater Spiritual values?
Answer: Truth? Here’s their form of truth:

Steve Hill –“If you want to be intimidated and lampooned, go to the Brownsville Assembly to “try the spirit.” I know because I went. Steve Hill was very upset when he came to the pulpit to preach that night. He said that he had to get something said before he could preach. Then he talked about the “FBI,” which he defined as the “Fault-finding Brothers International.” He spoke so arrogantly about anyone questioning this “move of God” that I had to claim the Blood to resist his criticism. This same intimidation has been reported all across the country. You will read of other similar statements in other parts of this report. A true move of God will invite Bible Bereans to line the walls and confirm the absolute truth of His visitation. It certainly will not offend God when we search the Scripture.” (The End Times and Victorious Living, March/April 1997, Vol. 11 No. 2, page 14.)

Greater Spiritual values? What about humility, servanthood, sacrifice … and above all, love? Would you call Rev. Kilpartick putting a curse on Hank Hanegraaff and the Christian Research Institute a good example of the spiritual value of loving your brother?:

“And Mr. Hanegraaff, I want to say to you, before you get back on national television and start spouting off at the mouth again about something of which you know nothing of, you’d better be careful, because God said, “Vengeance is Mine, saith the Lord.” And I want to say something else to you. If you want to keep any kind of a semblance of a ministry, you better back off from this revival and what God is doing. You better back off, because I’m going to prophesy to you that if you don’t, and you continue to put your tongue in your mouth on this move of God, within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down. I said, within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down.” (Rev. John Kilpatrick, Borwnsville AOG, 4/6/97)

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/mon6.htm

Prophecies Aim To Silence Critics 

PUBLISHED MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved
Kilpatrick predicts downfall of others 

By Alice Crann News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – The Rev. John Kilpatrick’s pronouncements of dire divine judgment on those who dare to question the Pensacola Brownsville Revival have caused quite a stir nationwide. 

Luther Edwards, the pen name of an Assembly of God pastor in the Midwest, calls Kilpatrick’s actions: “The Silencing of the Lambs.” 

That is the title of a paper Edwards submitted this year to Contemporary Pentecostal Issues an Internet forum in which Pentecostal and charismatic Christians can discuss and debate issues of their faith, doctrines and practices. 

“A prophecy is an inspired utterance,” Edwards said in an interview with the News Journal. “In Pentecostal circles, we differentiate between primary revelation, which is the Bible and which we consider infallible, and secondary revelation prophetic utterances that we do not consider infallible. “The purpose of prophecy 1 Corinthians 14 is edification, exhortation and comfort. The use of prophecy is not supposed to be for what Kilpatrick did to make a prophecy for the downfall of other people. It is not in the best tradition of Pentecostal history.” 

Kilpatrick made his prophecy about Hank Hanegraaff at Brownsville Assembly of God in a televised revival message on April 6. 

Hanegraaff is president of the Christian Research Institute in Southern California and host of the nationally syndicated radio show “Bible Answer Man.” He was on the April 4 episode of “Larry King Live” talking about his book “Counterfeit Revival: Looking for God in All the Wrong Places” and about how some Christian denominations use sociopsychological techniques to manipulate followers. Kilpatrick, who said he did not see this “Larry King Live” episode, said he became angry after someone who saw the show told him that Hanegraaff compared the revival to the Heaven’s Gate cult. 

On April 6 he made this prophecy against Hanegraaff: 

“I want to say something this morning to Hank Hanegraaff: “You better back off, because I am going to prophesy to you that if you don’t, and you continue to put your tongue in your mouth on this move of God, within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down. “I said: Within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down! “And I speak that as a man of God. … This is a move of God and you better leave it alone.” 

Hanegraaff told the News Journal: “Kilpatrick wildly distorted what I said, and he is making pronouncements under the auspices of the Holy Spirit. 

On June 18 — 72 days after he prophesied that the Holy Spirit would smote Hanegraaff — Kilpatrick recanted and apologized. 

Kilpatrick recently told the News Journal that looking back, he thinks he showed poor judgment. “I was wrong with Hank Hanegraaff — I called him and apologized,” said Kilpatrick during a recent interview at his home in Seminole Landing in Baldwin County, Ala. “What I said was not a prophecy.” 

Kilpatrick’s change of heart is good and bad, Edwards said. “He is admitting that he spoke falsely in the name of the Lord, that he spoke presumptuously. The fact that he has apologized is laudable. “But when he says he wasn’t really making a prophecy –that is disingenuous. The transcript shows he did.” Christian critics also are concerned about some other remarks Kilpatrick made during that April 6 service. Saying that he was addressing “Hanegraaff, and all other devils, Kilpatrick made a number of what he termed proclamations. They included: 

  • “No weapon that is formed against me or Steve Hill or this major outpouring of the Holy Spirit shall prosper. 
  • “I’m not worried about no bomb … I’m going to make this proclamation in the ears of God: Let ’em wire one. Let ’em get ’em Hertz or U-Haul and put it up outside in the front with fertilizer and all that mess. It won’t go off … I’m saying this in the ears of God: Father, let some heathen, let some devil-possessed person load up a truck of explosives or put a bomb in a bag. Let ’em do it … I make a proclamation, Lord, it shall never, ever go off in the name of Jesus. 
  • “The church known as Brownsville Assembly of God shall maintain its integrity and anybody that the devil tries to bring into this congregation for the wrong purpose shall fall away and never be heard from again and will have no effect whatsoever on this church in a negative way. 
  • “The supernatural, divine, Holy Ghost healings and deliverances and signs and wonders begin to drastically increase as to leave no doubts that God is still in the miracle-working business.”

Hearing those statements, Edwards said, he cannot keep silent about what he called Kilpatrick’s false prophecies and threats. Edwards, who has studied the sermon transcript, said: “The implication is clear: Those who voice criticism of any kind are the enemy and could face dire consequences.” As an Assembly of God pastor, he said, “I am concerned that some of what is happening at Brownsville is not representative of Pentecostalism. He said he was not attacking the Assemblies of God leadership or the revival but was raising questions about “the tendency to stifle dissent — the whole idea that if you question this revival God is going to get you.” 

Edwards, who identified himself to the News Journal, said he prefers to write under a pen name because he is concerned about retaliation from the national organization, which has endorsed the revival. “To go against church leadership would be viewed by them as disloyal and divisive,” said Edwards, and that could cause a pastor or church member to be ostracized. 

http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/kilpatrick2.html

Kilpatrick’s Deceitful “Apology” To Hank Hanegraaff

– by Sandy Simpson 

Brownsville AOG of Pensacola, FL has been painting whitewash on the walls of this revival from the beginning. This letter from Rev. John Kilpatrick is simply another stroke of that brush. It is a vain attempt, in the “prophesy, repent, prophesy” tradition of Benny Hinn, to back down from a direct proclamation that was made by them where they were crystal clear that they were speaking for God Himself. Here is the relevant quote from Rev. Kilpatrick’s letter which can be read in it’s entirety at the Brownsville AOG “revival” site.  (Since the writing of this article they took his response letter down but you can still see it because we thoughtrfully saved it for posterity on our web site. This is because we knew from past experience that it would be taken down pretty quickly.)
(Kilpatrick Letter 6/17/97:) “When I said, “I’m going to prophesy as a man of God that the Lord bring you down in 90 days,” I was not speaking that as a prophet but as a shepherd putting something in the ears of God. I did not say, “Thus saith the Lord”; it was a “Thus saith John Kilpatrick,” putting these words into God’s ears in the context of the message I was bringing. Let me reemphasize again that was me speaking.

(Kilpatrick Message 4/6/97:) “You’re all gonna have to pardon me for being beside myself, but I got a word from the Lord last night.”If Kilpatrick was not speaking as a prophet, then why did he make this statement in his message? These were the very first words of the message that Kilpatrick delivered where he cursed Hank Hanegraaff. Is this or is this not a “word from the Lord”? Either it is a word from the Lord and Kilpatrick was telling the truth and we will see the results of that prophesy come July 4, 1997, or it is not a word from the Lord and he was lying, therefore He is a false prophet.

(Kilpatrick Message 4/6/97:)”If you want to keep any kind of a semblance of a ministry, you better back off from this revival and what God is doing. You better back off, because I’m going to prophesy to you that if you don’t, and you continue to put your tongue in your mouth on this move of God, within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down. I said, within 90 days the Holy Ghost will bring you down.”What exactly does “I’m going to prophesy” mean to John Kilpatrick? What does it mean to those in his church that were listening to him? I think it means exactly what it means! You cannot take back this false prophesy now that it has escaped your lips. You are now a full-fledged FALSE PROPHET! I urge all who read this never to listen to the teaching of this man again. He cannot be trusted. Nor do I advise that Christians even go to Brownsville at all. Deception is rampant there. Don’t expose yourself, your children, or your church to this deception!

(Kilpatrick Letter 6/17/97:) “I want to emphasize also that I did not wish you any harm personally. I was talking about your ministry, I was saying, “God bring down your platform for crying out and associating us with a cult.” I did not nor do I wish you any harm. I ask your forgiveness if you thought I meant any harm to you personally. Honestly, before the Lord, I had your platform in mind, not the person Hank Hanegraaff.”

(Kilpatrick Message 4/6/97:) “And I want to tell you something else. If you don’t want your head to start shaking – you make fun of somebody in the choir shaking [Note: Hank Hanegraaff has never made fun of her, but has repeatedly expressed concern due to the physical and mental problems that can come out of shaking one’s head so vigorously for hours at a time for over a year and a half] – come here a minute, girl. Come down here a minute. Hurry up. Hurry up. [Note: Would you want to be spoken to in that way?] If you don’t want your head to do like this, you better lay your mouth off of her. I know this girl. She’s a godly girl. She’s a school teacher, and she lives a godly life.

Does this sound like Kilpatrick “did not wish (Hanegraaff) any harm personally”? He threatens Hank Hanegraaff with the Parkinson’s disease-like shakes that he has so liberally distributed to little girls in his congregation. Doctors have already said that this type of shaking, which occurs for hours at a time, will eventually produce all kinds of neuralogical problems later in life for these young people. This was a threat from a man who cares more about promoting himself as a latter-day apostle and prophet than the welfare and eternal condition of little girls in his congregation. He really ought to start any true repentance letter by asking all the children he has caused to have demonic manifestations and nightmares THEIR forgiveness.

(Kilpatrick Letter 6/17/97:) “This is by no means to be interpreted as an attempt to wiggle out of a prophecy. I would like to grant you the right to continue to count down the days and continue to comment about the 90 days. It’s ammunition that I gave you in April. I only want you to know — it was me speaking that and not a “thus saith the Lord.”You can be sure that Hank Hanegraaff, as well as the rest of the Christian church, will continue the countdown that YOU STARTED. No way to “wiggle out” now! As soon as you said that you were speaking for the Lord, you started an inevitable chain of events that are no longer in your control, nor the control of the Church. Your tongue has spoken “I’m going to prophesy”. Let this be a lesson to every Christian out there. Be VERY careful when you assume to speak for God directly.

(Kilpatrick Message 4/6/97:) … “I want to close by giving ten proclamations about how things are going to be. Mr. Hanegraaff, and all other devils, listen up. … I’m speaking this not just to you, friends, to impress you, but I’m saying this as a man of God from behind this holy desk in this holy environment of a great outpouring of the Holy Spirit. And I’m not saying this to you, but I’m saying this for the ears of God. And here’s what I’m saying. This revival shall not diminish and this revival shall turn into a national awakening.”This shows the true heart of this man, I believe. He has the audacity to put his money into the big vending machine in the sky and expect to get out a product called “national awakening”. He is not only speaking here to the people in his church or the Church at large, but now he presumes to speak directly to God, ordering Him to “not diminish” the revival. How dare he raise his voice to God! If I were in his shoes, I would get down on my knees right now and beg forgiveness of the Father for presuming to order God around. Yearning for revival and praying for it are one thing — commanding God to bring it is another.

(Kilpatrick Letter 4/6/97:) “What’s going on at the Brownsville Revival is about holiness and repentance. Those themes are the most prevalent characteristics of this visitation of the Holy Spirit. Every revival brings to the surface impurities. It has brought impurities in my life to the surface — and it’s ugly to have to deal with them. In keeping with the spirit of this revival I want to lead the way with public repentance.

I must wrap this commentary up with a comment on the above quote. I have gone much further into the details of this “counterfeit” revival before in my article “A Different Gospel?”, so I won’t get into those details here. But since Kilpatrick assumes that a revival is going on and He is commanding God to let it continue and grow into a “national awakening”, I must point out that, to begin with, there is no “holiness and repentance” revival going on in Brownsville. This is a continuation of a lie they have been posting all over the Internet and national Christian media about the revival. This revival is about getting “slain in the spirit”, “doing carpet time”, “laughing hysterically”, and “shaking and deep bowing”. A revival born of repentance has people crying and sorry for their sins and accepting Jesus as Savior and Lord. There may even be those who fall to their knees in worship and fear of the Lord. But when people start chanting “More, more, more” with their hands on people’s foreheads with catchers waiting to catch them from behind — when the largest part of the messages are devoted to prepping the audience to receive this “anointing” — when people lay on the floor and growl, cry, shake, make all kinds of animal noises, vomit ectoplasm, speak in tongues with no interpretation — when men preach from the pulpit and curse those who disagree with them to hell and call them “devils” — this is no revival of God, it is a circus where the enemy has free reign to come in and deceive even the elect, if that is possible.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/mon8.htm

Sadness, Fear Fill Members Who Left Brownsville

PUBLISHED MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved
Worship turned bizarre, frightening

By Alice Crann News Journal staff writer 

PENSACOLA – Hundreds of longtime Brownsville Assembly of God members have left their church since the revival began. 

They don’t know the numbers — though they believe it is about 800 — because most left quietly and kept their reasons to themselves. 

But as each day passes, the exiles learn about others who have mustered the courage to leave. They say that when Pastor John Kilpatrick first brought revival to the church, they were like sheep, attending night after night on his promise that the Holy Spirit was waiting inside — and because of his threat that if they didn’t hurry to heed the call, they would be doomed. 

But everything just became more confusing, they say. The Word, the very basis of their religion, was no longer the way. The leaders kept telling the prayer teams and church members to pay more attention to what they, the leaders, were saying than to what the Bible said. And evangelist Steve Hill’s repetitious screaming of “Fire! Fire! Fire!” superseded worship as they had known it. 

The dissenters say they loved and trusted Kilpatrick, but religion at Brownsville turned bizarre. The pastor’s response to their concerns was quick and harsh, they say. He told them they would “dry up and wither spiritually.” Kilpatrick had established that uncompromising tone when he set the stage for the revival. Several months before the revival began, he informed his congregation that if they did not go along with him, he would leave and find a church that would do what he wanted. 

The church members decided to give Kilpatrick and his revival a chance. Result: Hill and Kilpatrick turned the place of worship into a carnival, the dissenters say. Questions arose, from inside and outside the church. Result: Kilpatrick declared that demons were trying to destroy God’s work. Criticism of the revival’s tactics circulated among Christian leaders around the country. Result: Kilpatrick issued prophesies — the Lord’s words, he said — that the critics would suffer. Ultimately, many devout Pentecostal church-goers now want nothing more to do with the Assemblies of God denomination because it has failed to denounce the revival. They say they are happy in their new churches, but they grieve for the loss of their beloved home church. And they are profoundly fearful of Kilpatrick’s followers. They believe that if they are publicly identified as critics of the revival, they will be persecuted. They say they fear for their and their families’ personal safety, their businesses and their property. 

These are some of their stories: 

Couple A

They are quiet and very still, so close together on the parlor sofa they leave no doubt that they are of one mind. They are heartsick, and they speak painfully of what happened at Brownsville, like parents grieving the loss of a child. It has taken more than two years for them to be able to talk about the revival, to review those days of bewilderment, depression, alienation and fear. “Church members are intimidated and even excommunicated for speaking out against this move,” 

Mrs. A says. “You don’t know the beating we have taken — we have been totally shunned. “What hurt the most when we left was the absolute silence from people in that church who we believed were our friends. “We were called blasphemers.” Just saying that last word hurts. She is a devout, born-again Christian, firm in her spiritual convictions. Mrs. A says that when she saw and heard what Kilpatrick and Hill were doing and saying she urged others in the church to turn to the Bible because their actions and sermon messages did not line up with Scripture. 

“They seldom preach the word of God at the revival — it is mostly badgering and condemnation. But our friends did not want to hear this.” 

She says she is astounded by the number of people who are “still being deceived.” “I can’t believe they say that the revival just happened — that blows my mind. Everybody knows what happened on Father’s Day. Just look at the video.” 

The church members know the revival was planned for months, she says. But in the early days of the revival, Mrs. A succumbed to what she describes as Kilpatrick’s “manipulation and peer pressure.” And worst of all, she confesses, she even pretended to be “slain in the spirit.” “I’m so embarrassed because I faked it. But all I could think of at the time was: ‘What if I’m wrong? What if this is a move of God?'”

A week after she faked the manifestation, her husband fell to the floor during the revival and stayed down for 45 minutes.Was he, too, pretending? 

“I felt total confusion that day,” Mr. A recalls. “I was overwhelmed by my own submission. Today, I know it was emotional sensationalism brought on by the power of suggestion.” He fell, he says, because he wanted to be a part of the movement — the movement Kilpatrick was screaming in favor of from the pulpit. “The pastor I loved and respected was doing this.” When he got up from the church floor, Mr. A says, he cried. They were tears of bewilderment and loss. Back at home, depression replaced the tears. 

About a week later, when they returned to the church, reality cured the couple’s confoundment, they say. “We were up in the balcony looking down at the revival,” Mrs. A recalls. “What I saw reminded me of Moses watching over the Israelites worshiping idols, dancing hysterically and Aaron making a golden calf.” She and her husband looked at each other and knew, right then and there, that they had lost their church and their minister. They left and never returned. The couple says God’s word is sufficient for them. “We who left Brownsville are a blessed people,” Mrs. A says. “The Lord provided each of us with discernment that enabled us to see the truth in accordance to God’s word and leave the teaching of unscriptural doctrine that prevailed at Brownsville.” 

Mrs. B

Her eyes and face say it all. – Anguish. “I have always been very proud of my church, but this move is a threat to the very fiber of the Assemblies of God,” she says. “It is not OK what they are doing at Brownsville. I do not honor it by calling it a revival.” 

Mrs. B, a devout Assemblies of God member all her life, says Kilpatrick’s sermon messages became alarming when he saw that faithful members were beginning to object to the revival and refusing to participate. “When about 30 people left the church, there was a lot of criticism from the pulpit. Kilpatrick said awful things such as ‘the judgment of God will fall on them.’ 

“Sunday after Sunday, he berated those people. “It wasn’t right. What he was saying was diametrically opposed to what he used to say. I didn’t see him as a man of God anymore. “I have seen Pentecostal experiences, and I have had such experiences. But none of what was happening at Brownsville fit in.” “The word of God was no longer a part of our church,” Mrs. B says. “You could not worship there unless you worshiped like them, which was very structured and restrictive: You shook, or fell on the floor, or worshiped to the music.” 

She and her family left Brownsville, dazed and hurt. “My son became very skeptical of church, and, I guess, of God. I felt so awful. I felt like the Assemblies of God had failed me. I was determined not to go to another AG church again. “I wanted to find a church we could stay  with until we died.” And so she has. It is a Southern Baptist church that has welcomed her and her family and has tried hard to help them heal their spiritual wounds. But still she aches for the church she had to leave. 

Couple C

Mr. and Mrs. C were happy and content for many years at Brownsville Assembly of God. Now they are anxious and fearful. They seem to have to pull their thoughts away from concentration on solving a baffling puzzle. It’s hard to analyze what has happened to our church —    it is possible that Kilpatrick is not the man we thought he was,” Mr. C says, looking sadly over at his wife. 

Mr. C says: “I really believe that they believe what they are doing is right. But that’s what deception is.” Mr. and Mrs. C were so faithful to Kilpatrick and the church that they were chosen to serve on a revival prayer team. That lasted, however, only until they saw for certain what Kilpatrick and Hill were doing to the word of God. They were putting Scripture “on the back burner,” Mrs. C says. The prayer teams — who gather around people at the revival who request prayer — were specifically prohibited from praying. “We were instructed to not pray in Jesus’s name or pray for people’s needs,” Mr. C says. “All we were allowed to do was yell: ‘Fire! Fire! More! More!'”

Mrs. C says she turned in her prayer team badge because she could not, in all honesty, do any of that. “I was in absolute turmoil.” 

Mr. C says that when he was serving on the prayer team he just ignored the instructions and did what he knew was right: He prayed the word of Jesus and prayed for Jesus to answer people’s needs. Looking up from his tightly folded hands, his eyes sad, he says: “I should have gotten up and left on the day they told us to not pray in Jesus’s name. “I’m so embarrassed that I didn’t leave then.” 

Couple D

They sit across from each other, she on the sofa, he in a straight-backed chair. Every time his wife gives what he considers too much information, Mr. D stops her. “Remember what we talked about,” he says. “We must be careful.” Mr. D is afraid for his family. He fears retribution from revival followers. Mrs. D agrees. There is too much at stake. But then she breaks the silence by recalling her last day at Brownsville. “I prayed to God. I said: ‘God. I have waited so long to be saved. If this is not you, get me out of here.'” Mr. D says: “We left church that day and said we would never go back.” 

https://www1.cbn.com/spirituallife/what-happened-to-brownsville’s-fire

What Happened To Brownsville’s Fire?

I am wondering why the church that hosted hundreds of thousands of visitors has shrunk to a few hundred members, and now owes millions of dollars for a building they can’t fill. I am struggling to understand why so many people who once were part of the Brownsville church now feel hurt and betrayed. I am wondering if the leaders of this movement mishandled the anointing of God’s presence like Uzzah did when the ark of God almost toppled on the ground (see 2 Sam. 6:6-8).

The pastor of the church during the revival, John Kilpatrick, resigned in 2003 and told parishioners he planned to remain at the church in an apostolic role. Kilpatrick installed Randy Feldschau as the new pastor, then this year Kilpatrick shocked the congregation by starting a new church in Daphne, Ala., 50 miles west of Pensacola.

Feldschau resigned a few months ago and moved to Texas, and Brownsville’s attendance has dipped below 400. One former staff member told me that a large group of Brownsville members now attend a local Southern Baptist church in the city, while many others don’t go anywhere.“

People have been leaving for three or four years,” the pastor told me. “Some are not in church at all, including some who were on staff. I don’t know anyone who has not been hurt.”

At one point during the heyday of the movement, Korean pastor David Yonggi Cho announced from Brownsville’s pulpit that the revival “would last until Jesus comes.” Certainly the fruit of this revival will remain that long. But for those in Pensacola who were swept up in the ecstasy of those early years, and then endured splits, resignations, debts, and disappointments, the word “revival” now has a hollow ring to it.

What happened to Brownsville’s fire? The Florida church that hosted the Brownsville Revival has dwindled to a few hundred people. Did it have to end this way?

I’ll never forget my first trip to Brownsville Assembly of God. It was 1995, the year an unusual spiritual eruption occurred at the nondescript Pentecostal church in Pensacola, Fla.

The rumor was that God had visited the quiet Southern town. I came not only as a reporter, but also as a hungry seeker.

In the early days of the revival, the faithful came by bus, car and airplane from all over the world. Eager worshipers waited for hours in the sweltering humidity to get a seat for 7 p.m. services that often lasted past midnight. When evangelist Steve Hill finished his nightly sermons—in which he demanded repentance from spiritual compromise—the majority of people in the auditorium would run to the front of the church and bury their faces in the floor.

“The Holy Spirit is easily quenched by pride, greed, selfish religious agendas, and broken relationships. ”

Wailing was commonly heard during those meetings. Some people shook under the weight of conviction. It did not matter if you were a drug addict needing conversion or a pastor living in secret sin—everyone found forgiveness, and an unusual sense of refreshing in that holy place.

My life was changed there. I wept in the carpet, and repented for my journalistic cynicism. One night, in the midst of all the pandemonium near the stage, I ran over to where Hill was praying. He grabbed my head and screamed, “Fire! Fire! More, Lord!” I was one of the thousands who fell backward on that floor. I was not pretending. I felt as if God had placed a heavy blanket of His presence on top of me.

I don’t question whether the Holy Spirit was in that place. But today, more than 10 years after the Pensacola Outpouring occurred, I am asking other questions.

I am wondering why the church that hosted hundreds of thousands of visitors has shrunk to a few hundred members, and now owes millions of dollars for a building they can’t fill. I am struggling to understand why so many people who once were part of the Brownsville church now feel hurt and betrayed. I am wondering if the leaders of this movement mishandled the anointing of God’s presence like Uzzah did when the ark of God almost toppled on the ground (see 2 Sam. 6:6-8).

History shows us that revival is always risky. The devil opposes it, and carnal flesh gets in the way of it. The Holy Spirit is easily quenched by pride, greed, selfish religious agendas, and broken relationships.

I can’t be the judge of what brought Brownsville’s demise. But we must face the facts and learn some lessons, or we will repeat the scenario next time.

It is no secret that relationships among various leaders at the Brownsville church were strained to the breaking point. Michael Brown, once the leader of the Brownsville Revival School of Ministry (BRSM), was fired in 2000 and then started his own training center that he eventually moved to North Carolina.

BRSM in its heyday had an enrollment of 1,200 students. That number shrank to 120 this year. This week the church announced that the ministry school will relocate to Louisiana, where it will be directed by revivalist Tommy Tenney.

“One of the lasting legacies of the Brownsville revival is the school,” Tenney told me in an interview this week, noting that graduates are doing missionary work in 122 countries. One alumnus, in fact, was instrumental in discovering an unevangelized people group in Indonesia.

That is thrilling news. But my heart is still grieved that the church where this marvelous outpouring occurred is now a burned-out shell.

The pastor of the church during the revival, John Kilpatrick, resigned in 2003 and told parishioners he planned to remain at the church in an apostolic role. Kilpatrick installed Randy Feldschau as the new pastor, then this year Kilpatrick shocked the congregation by starting a new church in Daphne, Ala., 50 miles west of Pensacola.

Feldschau resigned a few months ago and moved to Texas, and Brownsville’s attendance has dipped below 400. One former staff member told me that a large group of Brownsville members now attend a local Southern Baptist church in the city, while many others don’t go anywhere.

“People have been leaving for three or four years,” the pastor told me. “Some are not in church at all, including some who were on staff. I don’t know anyone who has not been hurt.”

At one point during the heyday of the movement, Korean pastor David Yonggi Cho announced from Brownsville’s pulpit that the revival “would last until Jesus comes.” Certainly the fruit of this revival will remain that long. But for those in Pensacola who were swept up in the ecstasy of those early years, and then endured splits, resignations, debts, and disappointments, the word “revival” now has a hollow ring to it.

Still, my heart cries: “Lord, do it again.” Next time He does, I pray we will carry the ark the way God intended—and keep our hands off of it.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/strange3.htm

CLAIM: Brownsville leaders claim the Pensacola “revival” began spontaneously on June 18, 1995.               FACT: In the weeks prior to June 18 many key members of the Brownsville Assembly, including the pastor’s wife, visited Toronto, and they were earnestly seeking the same experiences for Brownsville. Prior to June 18 a video of the Toronto experiences was shown to the Pensacola congregation to encourage the congregation to desire the same thing. Prior to June 18, Pastor Kilpatrick talked persistently about bringing the Laughing Revival to Brownsville and threatened to quit if the church did not accept it (“Pastors orchestrated first revival Hill’s persistent urging pushed crowd to react,” Pensacola News Journal, Nov. 19, 1997). Pentecostal Evangelist Steve Hill was not randomly selected to speak at Brownsville on June 18. He was selected by Pastor Kilpatrick because Hills was earnestly desiring to be involved in the Laughing Revival and was searching for a place to conduct a long-running latter rain “revival.” Hills had recently sought the Laughing Revival anointing at Holy Trinity Brompton in London, England.

CLAIM: Brownsville leaders claim that on June 18 a mighty wind blew through the church, that it affected everyone present, that great numbers of people fell to the floor, that it was a mighty supernatural move of God. 

FACT: The video recording of the June 18 service and testimonies of people who were there disprove the claims. It is very evident, in fact, that the events were highly manipulated by Evangelist Steve Hill. When he first invited people to come forward for the laying on of hands, only nine people fell, but Hill continued to cajole the crowd. Eventually another six fell, then a few more. It all appears to be manipulated by Hill. In fact, so little happened in spite of Hill’s shouting and demanding and wheedling, it is embarrassing. When people began to leave the church, Hill shouted at them not to leave. In apparent desperation Hill called for all the children to come forward. He told them that he was going to pray for them and they were going to fall to the ground. In spite of his prodding, only one little girl fell down.

CLAIM: In their reply to the Pensacola News Journal, the Brownsville Assembly of God claims that the Journal was wrong in stating that there has been a large exodus of old-time members from the church. Following is the exact statement which is posted at the Brownsville web site: “Since the revival began in the Brownsville Assembly of God, less than 150 previous members have cancelled or moved their membership, while 1530 new members have been added. Of those members who were in the church for 25 or more years, none of them have left because of the revival, and only 4 officials out of 27 have left the church since the revival began. Simply stated, there has not been a mass exodus of members, contrary to allegations made by anonymous former members in the Journal.” 

FACT: Though this statement might be true technically, it is an attempt to hide the real situation. The fact is that a great number of Kilpatrick’s closest acquaintances rejected his “revival.” This is admitted by John Kilpatrick. For example, in his message at the National Church of God, Washington, D.C., June 7, 1997, Kilpatrick said: “We lost ALL of our best friends that we had in this world over this move of God. We lost them ALL.” Note the word “all.” The Pensacola News Journal article in question was titled “Sadness, fear fill members who left Brownsville,” Nov. 17, 1997. The Brownsville reply is a smoke screen. It merely dodges most of the assertions of the Journal’s report. The Journal stated, for example, that Kilpatrick claimed those who left were demonized and that he gave prophecies that those who resisted the “revival” would suffer. Those assertions are true. In his message on June 7 in Washington D.C., Kilpatrick mentioned one church member who left because of the “revival,” and he specifically said that she was manifesting demons.

CLAIM: John Arnott of the Toronto Airport Church says the healing of Sarah Lilliman is a key example of the miracles being performed in the Laughing Revival. According to Arnott, Lilliman was like a vegetable, totally incapacitated, paralyzed, and blind. One of her friends attended the Toronto church and after being slain in the spirit had a vision of Jesus telling her to go to Sarah, that He was going to heal her. Arnott claims that Lilliman subsequently “rose up seeing.” 

FACT: In Counterfeit Revival, Hank Hanegraaff exposes this false claim. He says the story is wildly embellished, that Sarah Lilliman was not totally incapacitated, paralyzed, and blind, that her doctors had diagnosed psychosomatic emotional problems underlying her physical problems. “Today, despite the broad circulation of this story by Arnott and his associates as evidence of God’s power in the Toronto Blessing, Sarah Lilliman is still, as before, legally blind. Unfortunately, just as before, she and her family are continuing to struggle with her physical and psychosomatic disorders” (Counterfeit Revival, p. 60). Hanegraaff’s testimony about Lilliman is confirmed in testimony available in the article “Jon Ruthven Admits Hank Was Right,” http://www.geocities.com/Bob_Hunter/lilliman.htm.

CONCLUSION

The Bible warns: “Mark them which cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which you have learned, and avoid them” (Romans 16:17). Certainly this applies to the Pentecostal-Charismatic movement. It has rightly been called the glue of the End Times Apostasy. The only protection from it is to obey the Bible and separate from it.

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/sun1.htm

Secrets Inside The Revival

PUBLISHED SUNDAY NOVEMBER 16, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved
Leaders shield finances, make many false claims

By J. Lowe Davis -Assistant managing editor

PENSACOLA – The numbers are amazing: Millions of visitors, millions of dollars, thousands of souls. The claims are heart-warming: crime curtailed, addiction overcome, sickness healed.The leaders are captivating: An ex-convict-junkie converted to evangelism; a visionary and prophet dedicated to revival.But how true is it all? Is Pensacola’s Brownsville Revival all that its leaders say it is? Are the leaders who and what they say they are?

The News Journal sought to answer those questions in a four-month investigation into the 2 1/2 year-old revival. The investigation focused on the revenue and the spending, the leaders’ backgrounds and lifestyles, the revival’s methods and messages, and the revival’s claims about healings, crime reduction and charity.Much about the Brownsville Revival is unquestionable: Millions of people from far and near have attended the four-nights-a-week revival Many have had an emotionally and spiritually stimulating experience there.Many have been baptized. Many have made a commitment to change their ways and live closer to God.

But much about the revival, as a business and a community influence, is questionable, and the answers cast it in a far different light.

Among the News Journal findings: –The revival did not begin the way Pastor John Kilpatrick and evangelist Steve Hill say it did. They say it was a spontaneous and overwhelming move of God and that everyone there felt it. But a videotape of the first service, plus the accounts from members who were there, reveal otherwise and indicate the revival was well-planned and orchestrated to become a large and long-running enterprise.

  • Money is flowing, information is not. Brownsville leaders refuse to disclose revenue and spending details, beyond an abbreviated, generalized financial statement that shows the church taking in $6.6 million in 1996. Not even members of the congregation are allowed to look at the books. 
  • Revival leaders are generating fortunes. The top four ministers have set up their own nonprofit corporations selling their own revival-related merchandise, such as books, tapes, T-shirts and bumper stickers. The merchandise is sold both inside the church and via mail order. Only one of the corporations is paying sales tax. 
  • Hill’s autobiography and oft-told stories about his outlaw past are contradicted by facts and by police records. He admitted to the News Journal that he fictionalized parts of his book for “impact.” 
  • Hill’s claims that most of his ministry’s revenue from the revival goes to missions and charities is contradicted in his ministry’s financial statement and Internal Revenue Service return. His assertions that his financial books are open are untrue; he would not share key information with the News Journal and sought to discourage questions. 
  • Kilpatrick has retreated from close contact with his flock while rapidly moving up into a luxurious lifestyle outside Pensacola. His new home, at an Alabama location he tried to keep secret, has barbed wire, a security guard and a metal gate. Months before an injury that kept him at home for weeks, Kilpatrick had ceased to keep office hours and had delegated his pastoring duties to assistants. 
  • Hill and Kilpatrick both have taken advantage of opportunities to conceal financial information. Both put “$10 and other good and valuable consideration” on their deeds as the price they paid for their new properties; Alabama allows people to do that if they wish to avoid public disclosure of the purchase price. 
  • The revival service’s spiritual messages and methods have distressed many devout Pentecostals and given rise to much criticism among theologians and Bible scholars. 
  • Kilpatrick has sought to silence dissent and criticism by prophesying — announcing he is voicing God’s own predictions — that the critics would die or suffer. 
  • The revival’s benefits to the Pensacola community are either overstated or untrue. For example: Top law enforcement officers cite data disputing the revival leaders’ statements that the revival has reduced crime. Social service agencies report having to serve a large influx of impoverished people who were drawn to Pensacola for the revival but who have been turned away by the church. Drug treatment centers report drug problems are on the rise, not dropping. Mental health centers report treating more out-of-town people than ever before, and most of them are people who came to Pensacola for the revival. Residents and businesses in the impoverished parts of the Brownsville community report that the church has done nothing for the area and refuses requests for help. 
  • The revival’s claims about healing are unsubstantiated by medical documentation. The revival touts cases in general but does not provide names or specifics. The News Journal found people who said they had been cured and healed, but none had medical proof from doctors. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/sun2.htm

Church Budget Is $6.6 million

PUBLISHED SUNDAY NOVEMBER 16, 1997
Copyright 1997 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved
2% is devoted to assist missions

By Amie K. Streater News Journal staff writer

PENSACOLA – The Brownsville Revival is known the world over for leading sinners to God. But the 2 1/2-year phenomenon is not only making Christians out of gang members and drug users, it is making millions of dollars. But for whom? 

Revival leaders talk at length about the souls they have saved, but they rarely talk about the money they have made. They tell expansive stories about the impact of the revival, but they downplay the expensive lifestyles the revival is underwriting. A four-month News Journal investigation has revealed spending practices that sharply differ from the activities worshipers are asked to finance. About 15 percent of the church’s $6.6 million budget -$1,019,406 – goes to salaries and benefits for 107 church employees, according to a brief and non detailed financial statement the Brownsville Assembly of God released to the News Journal. The church will not release specific information about the salaries and perquisites — including housing allowances — for the revival leaders. 

The revival leadership makes an unabashed call for money: “Reach into your wallets and pull out the biggest thing you can find,”Associate Pastor Carey Robertson urges, suggesting that $100 is an acceptable figure. Robertson and other leaders assure the audience that most of the money goes to missions — organizations working to spread Christianity. Yet after evangelist Steve Hill takes his share — the Friday night offering each week goes to Hill’s Together in the Harvest Ministries — the Brownsville church’s donations to missions amounts to 2 percent of the church’s annual budget. Church leaders call for money to cover the “tremendous” expense of keeping the church and revival going. Yet 14 percent of the budget goes to cover such costs. 

By comparison, the revival pumps substantial money — $1.2 million, or more than 18 percent of the budget –into activities that gross big returns: pastors’ conferences, videotapes and music tapes to sell to revival-goers. The church tells the revival audience that “our finances are in order” and “everything is open,” but the leadership refuses to make full disclosure of the budget details. “It’s nobody’s business but ours,” Robertson said. “We are not accountable to the people who come to revival because they are our guests. They are making a free-will offering and therefore should not expect an audit or an accounting. “If you wonder where the money is going, then don’t give. Obviously, we can’t spend money the way people want us to, but once it becomes a gift, it is ours to use. It is nobody’s business how we use it.” 

That goes for the Brownsville flock as well. The church’s membership gets an annual one-page statement, listing revenues and expenditures in general categories. Robertson and church treasurer R.L. Berry say detailed accountings are provided only to the church’s eight-member board of directors. No other church member can get financial answers without getting a two-thirds majority vote from the congregation authorizing release of the information. By contrast, large churches in the other major denominations in the Pensacola community make full financial disclosure. What is most clear about the Brownsville Revival money picture is that the leaders have found many ways to keep the money coming in. For example: 

  • The church videotapes the four-nights-a-week revival services and sells tapes by the thousands, at $15 and $10. 
  • Each of the four major revival leaders started his own individual ministry corporation to sell revival-generated materials and memorabilia. 
  • The revival leaders have published autobiographies and other books sold through the individual ministry’s corporation. 
  • The four top revival leaders have created an unofficial joint venture, Awake America, along with the Brownsville church. Using it as the umbrella organization, they go to big cities around the country to hold stadium revivals and share the proceeds. A recent two-night revival at The Pyramid, a large arena in Memphis, grossed $123,500. 
  • During the revival, sinners are coaxed to get rid of “articles of affection” –rings, bracelets, watches and other jewelry they received in adulterous affairs. Church leaders will not give specifics about how many such items show up in the offerings. 
  • The revival has given birth to a Bible college that in one year has brought in about $604,500. The church rents classroom space in a defunct Bible school on U.S. 98 in west Pensacola and charges its 507 students an instructional fee of $975 a semester, which includes books, but not room and board, for the 120 students who live on campus. The students are mainly young people who tell revival audiences that they were floundering through life before they found salvation at the revival. 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/sun3.htmOn the road:Pleas for money intensify 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/sun7.htmMinistry fails to meet watchdog’s guidelines

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/sun8.htmRevival for sale through merchandise 

http://op.50megs.com/ditc/brownsville1.html )-The Money And The Myths

http://www.mediaspotlight.org/pdfs/PENSACOLA.pdfPENSACOLA REVIVAL OR REVELING?
by Albert James Dager

https://discernmentministriesinternational.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/here-we-go-again/

Hill-Cooley-Kilpatrick Move On Embers Fade

The revival fire sputtered to an end by 2000. It seems that five years is historically about the extent of any Pentecostal “revival.” One can only sustain peak emotionalism for so long and the spiritual junkies seek ever increasing doses of transcendental highs. (6) Once the crowds (and offerings) began to dwindle and the manifestations became passé, Hill was the first leader to abandon ship. Lindell Cooley, the worship leader at BAG was the next to leave and by 2003 Kilpatrick himself resigned (or was asked to leave). Cooley and Hill both became pastors of their own congregations and Kilpatrick started his own “evangelistic” association. I might add that the same thing took place at TACF when the fire turned into cold ashes. John Arnott resigned as senior Pastor and started his own outreach.

Interestingly enough the Brownsville revival website does not mention much about all the controversy surrounding their move of the Spirit. They fail to mention the acrimonious split that occurred between BAG and the revival “Bible School” that had been birthed during the revival:

This group of students is particularly unique. With such a flood of interest in the school’s Fall session, this may be the only opportunity for such a small group of only 120 to commune together with the Holy Spirit and learn under tutors and elders while being in the midst of the mighty outpouring of Revival fire. (7)

The school started with big hopes but shortly became a divisive issue as the school ended up leaving the church and establishing itself down the road. Also these leaders failed to mention the scorching articles written about the revival in the Pensacola News Journal

A series of articles uncovered the following facts about the two main leaders, Kilpatrick and Hill:

The two ministers we investigated were the two who are most in the spotlight: John Kilpatrick, the pastor of the revival church, and Steve Hill, the revival’s evangelist Both live in Alabama, not Florida. Alabama’s records are not easy to access and track, but when we finally got the property records together, we could prove that the revival had provided those two men with dramatically improved lifestyles and successively large and more luxurious homes. Their primary source of revenue is the nonprofit corporation each one created…

We uncovered the ways the ministers turned Brownsville Revival into a million-dollar industry, and we uncovered the facts that contradicted their statements about how the money was used…We found and exposed the falsehoods in the public image that the evangelist [Hill] had constructed for himself…We debunked the revival leaders’ claims that they were performing miraculous healings. We tracked down a number of people the revival touted as “cured” and found none had medical evidence, such as lab tests, X-rays, or doctor’s examinations, to corroborate the cure…We exposed the origin of the revival, showing it was a planned and orchestrated event. A well-edited videotape of the first revival service appears to support the leaders’ claims that the revival was a spontaneous act of God. But close and attentive viewing reveals how it was manipulated to make the public believe the revival was spontaneous. (8)

Mr. Hill’s salvation testimony is riddled with exaggeration and outright lies but it does make for “exciting” reading, after all, God needs our help form time to time…ask Abraham. His claims of divine healing and miracles also proved to be false when given closer scrutiny. Hill reaped hundreds of thousands of dollars from the BAG outpouring and yet provided little if any genuine spiritual adulation began to dry up Hill knew it was time to head on down the road and form his own church, which he did in Dallas, Texas.

Arthur Katz on the ‘Brownsville Revival’

Arthur Katz On The ‘Brownsville Revival’

“Art Katz, in an article titled “Some Cautionary Thoughts on the Present Revival” expresses very well some of our concerns:

“Perhaps one of the most ominous features of the hour is the note of warning sounded about those who have some reserve as being ‘obstructions,’ ‘enemies,’ or ‘threats’ to this outpouring of God. The invitation seems to be to abandon all restraint (‘The bar is open’) — leap in, or get out of the way of others if you cannot! … I cannot help but wonder if it is man’s interests that are being so vehemently defended and that we are at the inception of what could ultimately be finalised by the warning that ‘they will kill you and claim that they are doing God a service”‘ (John 16:2).(1)

“Katz went on to quote T. Austin Sparks, who compared the Corinthian church’s propensity for sensational evidences to its modern counterpart:”

“We are in that kind of age today. It is becoming more and more a psychic age. It is an age of the soul just spilling over, asserting itself, taking control of everything Christian as well as outside of it—a soulish age. … Be careful that you are not hankering for this realm again. Are you after the evidence? My, how I have seen dear Christian people just prostrating themselves, with groaning and crying, almost screaming for evidence—these ‘sign’ things… Christians and dear men of God, who have been greatly used, are creating an emotional, psychic situation that is involving simple Christians in things which are, sooner or later, going to be a great disillusionment and an offense. It will bring ‘offendedness’ with the Lord, and that is just what the devil is after.” (2) http://www.banner.org.uk/brn/pensacol.html

“I agree with A. W. Tozer who said,

“I am a Bible Christian and if an archangel with a wingspread as broad as a constellation shining like the sun were to come and offer me some new truth, I’d ask him for a reference. If he could not show me where it is found in the Bible, I would bow him out and say, ‘I’m awfully sorry, you don’t bring any references with you.”‘ (9)

This is not the attitude at Pensacola. There, the preaching of the Word is minimised, trivialized and criticized. Any spiritual movement that is not based on the truth of the Word and the honest preaching of that Word must be rejected.

The Pensacola revival has created in the Pentecostal church a paradigm shift in its understanding of the authority of Scripture, the work of Christ, the character of the Holy Spirit and His work in the church and the plan of God. This shift is a major one. It is laying the ground work for the next “move of God” that will make the Pensacola fiasco pale into insignificance.”

© Copyright 1997 Rev Larry Thomas (now deceased)


One thought on “Brownsville ‘Revival’- Before The Beginning – A Different Story

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